New cancer care center will open April 2

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The new Swedish/Edmonds Cancer Care Center will open for patients on April 2. The modularly-constructed building allows for easy future expansion.

 

Story and photos by Larry Vogel

Swedish/Edmonds’ new state-of-the-art cancer care facility will open its doors to patients on April 2.

Located just east of the main campus at 21632 Highway 99, the center is the latest addition to the Swedish Cancer Institute’s network of community-based cancer centers. Offering a full range of services for cancer patients and their families including chemotherapy, counseling, financial services, patient education and supplies, the new center joins existing facilities in downtown Seattle, Ballard, Bellevue, Issaquah and Burien.

“With the opening of the Edmonds Cancer Care Center, we bring downtown levels of care right into the community,” said Dr. Eileen Johnston, one five physicians who will be located at the new facility. “It’s all about access,” she said. “The best care in the world does little good if the patient can’t get to it.”

The facility itself is light, airy and pleasant to be in. There’s plenty of glass, dense landscaping and even a large water feature outside the glassed-in waiting area. The infusion area features large, light rooms, and gives patients the option of receiving treatments in a variety of settings.

“Many patients prefer a more social setting, and like to converse and interact with others while receiving their treatment.” Johnston said. “Others prefer a more private setting.”

To further enhance its connection to the community, the center will display works by several local artists. Art Program Manager Nancy Stoaks has been working with local galleries and artists and has chosen more than 30 pieces to display at the center. Look for works by Edmonds artists Mona Smiley-Fairbanks, Kimberlie Brayman and muralist Andy Eccleshall, among others.

Once the facility is up and running, it will serve up to 175 patients per day for services varying from routine blood draws to complex chemotherapy infusion. The five staff physicians each anticipate seeing 18-24 patients per day.

“We expect to be operating at near this level within the first month,” Johnston said.

But what about meeting future growth? No problem, thanks to the innovative design of the building. Its modular construction allows easy expansion when the need arises, and there’s plenty of open space on the site.

If you’re interested in seeing for yourself, the new cancer center will be open for public tours on Wednesday, April 17 from 4-7 p.m.

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To further enhance its connection to the community, the Center will display numerous works by local artists. Here Swedish Foundation Assistant Director Lindsay Hopkins and Swedish Art Committee member Janette Turner hold up a work by Edmonds muralist Andy Eccleshall.

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The building was designed and sited to make maximum use of available light. The design is intentionally open, allowing light to filter throughout the interior space.

 

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