Foster kittens steal the show at PAWS Safety Day

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Sarah Wilson of Lynnwood bottle feeds a kitten during PAWS Safety Day on Saturday in Lynnwood. Wilson has fostered kittens through PAWS for a year and a half.

By David Pan/Lynnwood Today editor

PAWS Pet Safety Day featured educational activities, demonstrations and opportunities to have pets microchipped.

But it’s safe to say that the real stars of Saturday’s event in Lynnwood were some adorable kittens, who were helping to promote PAWS Foster Care program.

The program utilizes a network of foster homes to provide temporary housing for cats, kittens, dogs and puppies. People who foster animals help prevent overcrowding and give puppies and kittens the extra time and attention they need. Cats and dogs who have colds, injuries or other illnesses benefit from the comfort of a quiet home.

Sarah Wilson tends to a kitten during PAWS Safety Day.

Sarah Wilson tends to a kitten during PAWS Safety Day.

Sarah Wilson, a freelance artist from Lynnwood, has fostered mainly kittens for a year and a half. Wilson usually fosters special needs kittens, who have to be bottle fed. Generally, Wilson fosters a kitten for about four to six weeks. But there are exceptions. One she fostered for five months.

“I ended up adopting him,” said Wilson, who has three cats.

What Wilson especially likes about fostering kittens is that she gets “have them when they are cute” and when they have grown up a little the kittens return to PAWS to be adopted.

Animals are matched to suit volunteers’ schedule, experience and preference. PAWS requires an orientation session and provides training.

“You learn what your responsibilities are,” Wilson said. “You learn what to do in case of an emergency.”

PAWS provides veterinary care and medicine for foster animals. More than 1,000 animals are put in foster care every year.

A kitten is taken care of by Sarah Wilson during PAWS Safety Day.

A kitten is taken care of by Sarah Wilson during PAWS Safety Day.

Erik Ziegler and Becky Johnson of Everett probably aren’t looking for another pet right now since they already are the proud owners of Pivot, a nine-month old Belgian Malinois.

The two came to PAWS Pet Safety Day to get Pivot microchipped. Pivot appeared a little bit nervous being around new people and surroundings, but PAWS veterinarian Liz Vincenzi and veterinary assistant Caren Malgesin calmed him down long enough for the microchip to be successful implanted.

For more information about PAWS Foster Care program or microchipping services, see www.paws.org.

PAWSPAWS veterinarian Liz Vincenzi and veterinary assistant Caren Malgesin get ready to place a microchip into a nervous dog named Pivot.

PAWS veterinarian Liz Vincenzi and veterinary assistant Caren Malgesin get ready to place a microchip into a nervous dog named Pivot.

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