Lynnwood City Hall art gallery showcases works by Seattle-based artists

“The Seattle Wheel” by Chris Buckley

The City of Lynnwood is featuring the work of two Seattle-based artists at Lynnwood City Hall. The art will be displayed until Sept. 10. City Hall is located at 19100 44th Ave. W.

City Hall is open Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Evening hours for Mondays (except for holidays) and third Wednesdays are 6:30-9 p.m.

Chris Buckley grew up in England, where he worked as a graphic designer at The Wellcome Trust — a leading London-based charity. During this time, he studied art and design. After immigrating to Seattle in the late 1990s, he spent his time raising his four children, teaching art in elementary schools as a volunteer, and writing and illustrating a children’s book titled Hammering Man Takes a Stroll. He said his work is inspired by his childhood in England and his new life in Seattle.

He has showcased his collaborative multimedia choreographies and Visual Arts at Seattle based institutions such as Velocity Dance Center, On the Boards, Jack Straw New Media Gallery, Soil Gallery, King County Arts Commission, Bumbershoot and others.

“My art is my visual diary reflecting all that excites me about the world around me, past and present,” he said.

To view more of Buckley’s work, visit his website at chrisbuckleyart.com.

“Bifurcated Light” by Seth Sexton

Seth Sexton was raised on a farm in Chimacum, Wash. He attended the University of Washington and received a bachelor of fine arts in painting/drawing in 2003. Having returned to contemporary dance practices in 2012, he continues to incorporate the rituals and patterns of agrarian society with visual and performing arts. Sexton has showcased his collaborative multimedia choreographies and visual arts at Seattle-based institutions such as Velocity Dance Center, On the Boards, Jack Straw New Media Gallery, Soil Gallery, King County Arts Commission, Bumbershoot and others.

Sexton said he creates meticulous pen and ink drawings that often take months to create. Central to his work are repetition and pattern and the accretion of marks into concise states of order.

“The images are iconic, abstract, and craft-like, reminiscent of reliquary, Moroccan tribal rugs, or aboriginal dream paintings,” he said. “A symbolic roadmap from the inner workings of the body to the stars in the heavens.”

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